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Featured Physicians

Taya V. Glotzer, M.D., FACC, FHRS

Professor of Medicine, Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine and director of Cardiac Research, Hackensack University Medical Center

Updated: October 5, 2021

Taya V. Glotzer, M.D., FACC, FHRS, Professor of Medicine, Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine and director of Cardiac Research, Hackensack University Medical Center, presented new data about the heart and
COVID-19 and other key topics at the Heart Rhythm Society 2021 Annual Scientific Sessions held in Boston, MA, July 26-30.

New Data about the Heart and COVID-19

Dr. Glotzer presented the findings of “Admission Electrocardiogram (EKG) Abnormalities Associated with Mortality in Patients with COVID-19,” research that she conducted with a group of cardiologists at Hackensack University Medical Center. The study showed that there are signals on admission EKGs that might predict which patients admitted with COVID-19 would have poor outcomes.

Four EKG parameters were found to signal possible poor outcomes: the presence of atrial premature beats, any atrial-ventricular block, poor R wave progression (absence of normal increase in size of the R wave), and prolonged QT interval, the section on the EKG that represents the time it takes for the heart’s electrical system to reset. The study also found that
mortality was more prevalent in patients with age greater than 60 years, male gender, obesity, and elevated troponin (a protein that is integral to cardiac muscle contraction).

Dr. Glotzer and her team have also published findings on the effects of COVID-19 on blood pressure and cardiac muscle function.

“Optimizing Remote Monitoring for Atrial Fibrillation”

Dr. Glotzer was invited to present: “Optimizing Remote Monitoring for Atrial Fibrillation” at the Heart Rhythm Society conference in July 2021. In this presentation, she advised cardiologists, nurses, and nurse practitioners how best to manage arrhythmias that are detected by implanted cardiac rhythm devices.

She explained that utilizing internet connectivity, it is now possible to review individual patients’ heart rhythm status on a daily basis.

As this innovative diagnostic capability is generating large amounts of data, protocols for triage and automated management of this new information are being developed, she explained. In her presentation, Dr. Glotzer discussed optimal remote monitoring techniques for detection of atrial fibrillation.